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. >> ban ki moon has arrived in cairo in support of the cease- fire between israel and hamas. >> the exiled leader of hamas says they must take the first up a bit want the truce in israel. they will consider a cease-fire in israel and their attacks and the siege of gaza. >> israel has bombed building and at least 90 people have been killed and some 700 wounded since the air strikes began. >> the bombardment of gaza continues. israeli defense forces are picking targets they say it are connected to palestinian militants. the billionaire also among the latest casualties. across the border in israel, ground troops are massing in preparations for a possible invasion. israel has no mobilize and 40,000 reservists. elsewhere, diplomats are attempting to broker a ceasefire. in jerusalem, middle east peace envoy tony blair met with perez to stop the rocket attacks. >> it is clear we do not have any ambition to gain an advantage but we just want to stop the fire. >> more than 1000 rockets have been fired from a hamas- controlled gaza into israel. the defense system has stopped most of the rockets and
of them palestinians. palestinian militants have continued firing weapons into israel. in cairo, discussions are ongoing about cease-fire. jeremy our coverage from gaza. >> good morning, gaza. this was the wake-up call sent in by israel. growing up in gaza is not easy. not far away, is the rubble left by the israeli strike on sunday that killed 10 members of this family including four children and two neighbors. they are looking for the remains of a teenage girl missing and presumed dead. this man is a relative of the dead. >> sad, may be strong. >> street are getting tougher, more solid. when they tell the parents of a boy, he will grow up for revenge. >> during the last of years, the conflict has been overshadowed by dramatic changes elsewhere in the middle east. the differences between the two sides got sharper. what makes this crisis difficult and dangerous is it is happening in a region more unstable than at any time since the 1950's. hamas released videos of rocket launches. the events of the last few weeks have silenced those who said they had forgotten how to fight israe
into effect just moments ago. >> that's right. the deal was announced in cairo by the egyptian foreign minister and the u.s. secretary of state. the truce calls for an immediate halt to the fighting and reportedly aims to work towards a longer-term solution as well. >> the latest escalation in violence began just over a week ago. since then, some 140 palestinians and five israelis have been killed in air strikes and rocket attacks. >> we will be trying to go live to cairo and also to gauze in a moment, but first, let's get back to evens earlier in it -- earlier in the day that threatens to derail the talks -- we will be trying to go live to cairo and also to gaza in a moment. >> panic on the streets of televisa. ambulances rushed to the scene of the explosion. -- panic on the streets of tel aviv. the bus was burned out but not torn apart, suggesting it may have been a relatively small bomb. israel is calling this a terrorist attack. >> hamas is a murderous organization, an organization that calls for israel's destruction. anyone who negotiates with them and the prime minister's holding
pictures now. cairo, egypt, tahrir square. and thousands of people are refusing to go home. they are angry at their president. they say he's made himself a dictator. it's quiet now in cairo. it's just after 2:00 a.m., but it definitely was not quiet earlier in the day. listen. tear gas filled the air and crowds of protesters scattered when riot police tried to break up the protests in cairo. we have reports of demonstrators trying to break into the offices of the president's party, the muslim brotherhood. and at least one person reportedly died today in the street violence, a teenager. cnn's reza sayah spent much of the day right in the middle of the chaos in cairo. >> we keep seeing these clashes between protesters and police, protesters throwing rocks at police. police responding by firing tear gas and stun grenades. we're just a few blocks away from tahrir square. we should point out most of these protesters are young men, 20-something, teenagers, hard to say if they're here fighting for democracy or here to cause some trouble. those were chants of down with president mo
. >> this morning saw relative calm in cairo's tahrir square, but protesters insisted they will not latest site until president morsi withdraws the sweeping decree he issued last week. it gives him broad new powers, free from judicial review. >> ( translated ): we demand the president listens to the people who chose him, the people who elected him so he would defend the people. >> reporter: that could provoke more trouble after a weekend of violence hitting liberal and secular factions against morse's islamist supporters. last night in cairo, protesters threw rocks at police who fired back with tear gas. demonstrators also clashed with pro-morsi egyptians. attacks on the local offices of the muzz lum brotherhood left one teenager dead and dozens of people wounded. thousands of the president's backers staged rallies in several cities. >> we support mohamed morsi's correct decision and eventually the good from the bad will be distinguishable. we support dr. morsi. >> u.s. officials raised concerns about morsi's decree. today the state department's victoria newlyand called for calm. >> what is imp
. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into gaza. president obama spoke by phone today with the leaders of both egypt and israel. >> translator: i have agreed with the president that israel and the united states would work together to prevent the smuggling of arms to the terror organizations. the vast majority of which comes from iran. >> throughout this crisis cnn has positioned crews throughout the region including correspondents in egypt and on both sides of the israeli/gaza
. the launch pad for peace may be in cairo. in the last 24 hours egypt has been mediating high-stakes discussions between israeli and hamas leaders. speaking today egyptian prime minister hish m kandil said -- in gaza, palestinian medical officials report 95 people have been killed in gaza including 23 children. for the second straight day, israel bombed a building housing local and international media. the target of the attack was a commanding member of an islamic jihad group who also had an apartment in the building. meanwhile, hamas continues to send rockets deep into israel. last night, israel's iron dome intercepted two rockets headed for tel aviv. yesterday, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu had tough talks on twitter writing we are exacting a heavy price from hamas and the terrorist organizations. the idf is prepared for a significant expansion of its operation. in a press gaggle on route to cambodia this morning, deputy national security adviser ben rhodes says the white house's goal is to have nations with influence in the region speak for deescalation. speakin
tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all
the border. today secretary general ban ki-moon arrived in cairo to support egyptian-led efforts at a cease-fire. yesterday, president obama spoke about the situation from thailand, he is viz thing country as part of a three-country asia tour. >> we are fully supportive of israel's right to defend itself from missiles landing on people's homes and workplaces and potentially killing civilians. and we will continue to support israel's right to defend itself. >> rose: here's what "cbs evening news" reported today from the war zone. >> an angry crowd gathered outside a hospital in gaza this morning as bodies of children killed in yesterday's air strike were brought out to be buried. the four children died, along with their mother and four other family members when their three-story home was hit by an israeli air strike. the husband and father who lost his family was inconsolable. the israeli military says the house is targeted because they believe the hamas commander responsible for launching missiles toward israel was hiding there. but with nine members of the same family killed, the israelis
to deescalate the situation in gaza. >> rose: the secretary of state travels to cairo tomorrow to take part in further negotiations, joining me now is rashid khalidi, he is the edward site professor of modern arab studies in columbia university, in washington dennis ross is with the washington institute for near east policy and a former u.s. envoy to the middle east. >> and abrams on the council for foreign relations a deputy national security advisor for global democracy strategy for president bush. his book tested by zion comes out later this year and i am pleased to have all of them here on this program this evening. i begin with dennis ross, tell me where you think we are at this moment, dennis. >> well, i do think the outline of the cease-fire are probably getting pretty close to being finalized, i don't think they are quite finalized yet, not because the outlines are unclear but because i think there is probably a desire to have the secretary of state make certain that the understandings are understood the same way by all of the parties, number one, number 2, that there are actually p
, but they have a relationship with the egyptians. there have been israeli envoys that have gone to cairo to meet with high-ranking egyptian officials. trying to broker a deal. no trust, hamas has to trust for the israelis and israelis have no trust for the hamas. there have been a lot of rockets and missiles coming from gaza into israeli and the israeli air strikes pounded away at targets in garz. a lot of casualties. there's no goodwill on the part of either of these, they don't trust each other. having said that, looks like they're close. hamas seems to think within the next hour or two some agreement will be announced, thanks to the egyptians. but i spoke with the israeli government spokesman for the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu in the past hour, he said there's no deal yet. he didn't rule out there wouldn't be a deal but he said there's no deal yet. until all of the is are dotted, t richardson cros are crossed. until there's a deal, there's no deal, as they like to say, the diplomatic community. >> we also know the president, president obama, has called and talked to the preside
senior hamas official who said that at 9:00 p.m. cairo time, 10:00 p.m. eastern standard time, that there would be an announcement in cairo, by an official, from the egyptian government and from hamas, announcing some sort of agreement for at least a temporary cease-fire. however, we're hearing from other hamas officials that israel has yet to agree to this proposed cease-fire and the israelis are saying there is nothing as of yet. but the idea is rather than send out broad guidelines for a period of peace and calm, they just want to see if both sides can keep the peace. now, one of the concerns here is that it is not just hamas who is operating in gaza, there are other groups like islamic jihad, affiliated with iran, even smaller splinter groups out there that hamas doesn't necessarily control completely. and therefore that's why they want to give this -- this initial period to see if the peace can indeed or quiet or calm can hold. >> ben, in terms of the entire region, and we're standing sort of by a map which i want to show our viewers, this and is of israel, you've got the
rescind a decree that gives him unlimited power. we get more now from cairo. >> reporter: outrage, clashes, and anguish in tahrir. thousands of angry egyptians back in a public square that has become the arab world's emblem for the democratic right to protest. this was where egyptians demanded the ouster of former president hosni mubarak last year. this time, the fury aimed at current president mohamed morsi. >> we're here because we don't want him to rule us anymore. >> it's a one-man show. he wants to do everything. this is nothing at all what we want. >> reporter: on thursday, the new islamist president made himself the most powerful man in egypt by announcing sweeping decrees he says are designed to push forward the drafting of egypt's new constitution and speed up the formation of a government that still is missing a parliament. >> whether it causes anyone to overturn any of the declarations. that's the same place the parliament is born. technically, it means for now he can do whatever he wants without any oversight. >> i felt he was telling us, you guys don't exist. it's just me and
of protests that continues to rage across the country. meanwhile the u.s. embassy in cairo says there are sporadic clashes between protesters and police near its entrance. we're told some rocks landed inside the walls of that huge compound. embassy officials say there is no indication they are the target. egypt wields enormous influence in the middle east peac process. that power demonstrated by brokering the cease-fire between is rainfall and hamas. steve care began streaming live too cairo with the latest developments right now. steve? >> reporter: jon, this is a key meeting between egypt's president and the chief justices in cairo. already there are hints from the president's side that compromise may be in the offing. perhaps a scaling down of that presidential decree which basically puts the president above the law and above the courts. the judges have been one of the bitterest opponents of the movement by the president. many judges across the country actually going out on strike. we may see a compromise in the meeting. appears the president underestimated the reaction to hi
whether it is the cairo speech he delivered in 2009 or your repeated at important declarations on prevention of the iranian nuclear capability, actions matter most. do not mistake the former for the latter. i have to step out of my role for a moment because as an historian, today is the anniversary of my favorite ever presidential statement on the middle east. 70 years ago today, president franklin delano roosevelt issued the following statement to the peoples of the middle east -- imagine a president saying this -- "praise be done to you under god the compassionate and made the blessing of god be upon you. this is a great deal for you because behold, we, the american holy warriors have arrived. we have come here to fight the great jihad of freedom. we have come to set you free. today is the 70th anniversary of the landing on north africa. imagine an american president praising the great jihad of american freedom. we don't remember that because of words matter so much less than actions. all right, if those are three broad lessons, what are the three most urgent issues of your a
. >> don't interrupt me. right now, there's an israeli in cairo dealing with the egyptians who are walking down the hall and talking with hamas. israel knows who they're dealing with here, they know quite well who they're dealing with here, and they can make a deal with them. what's wrong with that. >> let's not pretend that israel and hamas are not speaking to each other. >> i hope they are speaking to each other. we have to leave it there. please come back soon. that was a fascinating debate. an american icon, a preview of a o aritooladan conrsio >> a lot of the people of gaza are not happy about the fact that hamas fighters are fighting in bunkers that were built for them. leaving their own civilians to be exposed, firing rockets through the civilian areas. >> let's finish the history that mark was talking about there. it's very important. >> the whole entire point of isolating and cutting off gaza, hamas controlled gaza, was to punish them for the election of hamas, and to say that this kind of intransigence against israel is not going to be tolerated. at the same time, we will open u
in this process. i will carry this message to cairo tomorrow. i will also be consulting with president abas in ramala. let me also say to echo the prime minister, i'm very pleased that the iron dome defense system is performing so well. our partnership in support of this system represents america's enduring commitment to the safety and security of the israeli people and to israel's right to defend itself. but no defense is perfect. and our hearts break for the loss of every civilian israeli and palestinian and for all those who have been wounded or who are living in fear and danger. i know today was a difficult day. and i offer my deepest condolences to the loved ones of those who were lost and injured. in the end there is no substitute for security and for a just and lasting peace. and the current crisis certainly focuses us on the urgency of this broader goal. so in the days ahead the united states will work with our partners here in israel and across the region toward an outcome that bolsters security for the people of israel, improves conditions for the people of gaza and moves toward a
leaders from both sides met in cairo to discuss putting an end to the bloodshed. egyptian president mohamud morsi is overseeing the talks and he has become the central figure in the delicate negotiations. morsi was at his sister's funeral today but he did issue a statement saying israeli aggression would end today. tuesday. at the end of the day the two sides still had not reached agreement. a hamas official told reuters they had come close but the talks "must wait until tomorrow." now this is morsi's real debut on the world stage. he rose from his position as head of the engineering department at a cairo university to become president of egypt last year. it's really an intriguing story. morsi replaced, as you know, president hosni mubarak who had been in power for three decades and was one of israel's few allies in the region and morsi ran as the muslim brotherhood's candidate and he promised to implement islamic law. but analysts say that he's not really a true religious fundamentalist. that he had to adopt those p
the professor can speak in free times from cairo now is an indication that freedom of speech is still very much alive in egypt and also an indication that mubarak is no longer in power and you know, morsi is dependent on the u.s. for aid. dependent on the imf. international opinion will not allow for mubarak, for morsi to consolidate power around him. >> you said mubarak. >> freudian slip. >> what do you think about that? is morsi a long away way from being an islamist dictatdictato? >> in terms of expression, i could speak to you three and four years ago from cairo and freely as i have done just right now and i did speak several times. criticizing measures and policies took and put forward by the president and his government. so in terms of freedom of expression, it's not a huge leap, but let me remind you as well of the fact that at least one chairman was closed in the last weeks in a step which we considered egypt to be negatively imposing a democratic limit on tv channels. however, if we sustain checks and balances, in the moments in which do not have a branch of government, and morsi is th
of protests against his actions. on tuesday, at least 200,000 people filled cairo's tahrir square, accusing morsi and his muslim brotherhood of hijacking last year's revolution. liberal and secular groups also condemned a move to fast-track a final vote on a new constitution. >> ( translated ): we want a constitution that represents all egyptian people, not one that represent a certain faction of egyptians. >> ( translated ): the constitutional panel tasked to >> brown: the constitution is being drafted by an assembly dominated by islamists. that body moved up the vote to this week, because the country's supreme constitutional court is expected to issue a ruling on sunday that could dissolve the assembly. in washington today, state department spokesperson victoria nuland also raised concerns about the new constitution. >> we've been very clear all we want to see this constitution meet international human rights standards, protections for all groups in egypt and to have a judicial set of guarantees that also meets international judicial standards. but again we haven't seen the specific draft
" in order to promote stability. steve harrigan is live in cairo. what is the draft constitution? >>reporter: well, opposition figures including the nobel peace prize laureate is calling the constitution a coup against democracy. they are sharply criticizing it as a rush drive, 16 hours of voting on a constitution, pushing it through only after all moderates, liberals and christians have left the room in protest. right now it stands to go to referendum in 15 days but the anger against it and the concerns about the protection of women under the new constitution, the role of islam under the new constitution, that has raised the number of protesters we are seeing tonight. >>shepard: and nothing has lessened the numbers. >>reporter: it was an intent to try and stem the profit but the reverse is happening with larger and stronger crowds than last night. some of the opposition leaders say they vow to sleep in this square until the president backs down. the president has supporters and we are likely to see the muslim brotherhood to come out to support the president. >>shepard: thank you, steve harr
have reports from gaza city and tel aviv, and talk with journalist nancy youssef in cairo, where diplomatic efforts to broker peace are under way. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the other hot conflict in the middle east, in syria. margaret warner takes us inside the opposition forces and examines turkey's efforts to help the rebels. >> gist around this corner down this cobblestone street is a back alley where you can fiefned a whole underground economy. an underground economy that helps keep the syrian resistance going. >> brown: president obama makes an historic trip to myanmar. ray suarez looks at the asian country's steps away from a closed military dictatorship. >> woodruff: paul solman reports from the rockaways on new york's long island about insurance woes for victims of hurricane sandy. >> everything you're looking at here is destroyed. this used to be a really beautiful restaurant. >> where is the financing coming from if you don't have flood insurance? >> i don't know. i really don. >> brown: and we close with the first of several conversations we'll have with newly elec
with any envoys. he will be heading back to cairo tomorrow to meet with hillary clinton. egyptian officials involved or familiar with them have been telling nbc news this is unlikely to be a long-term truce. this is more likely to be a cessation of hostilities in the short term to pave the way for longer discussions about the fundamental issues as to why this persistent problem keeps coming up, the siege on gaza, rockets into southern israel and outstanding issues. what we can say so far is that all indications suggest that there will be a truce at some point. palestinian factions here say they are open to it. they say nothing has been signed. they don't mind having a short-term truce. so long as egypt will guarantee the fundamental issues of the bigger problems of gaza are addressed and not kicked down the road. i think that's something that martin suggested. there are a lot of fund mental issues that need to be resolved. no indication all of those have been addressed in the short-term cessation of hostilities which egyptian officials say is within their reach, although nothing yet officia
have been announced hours ago in cairo. clearly, that's not happening. there's no sign of a cease-fire. in fact, certainly, if you look -- if we go back over the last few hours, five or six hours, it's been an evening of fairly intense fire, not only incoming israeli air strikes, but just a little while ago, we saw two rockets being launched also from this area behind me. and certainly by the looks of those rockets, and we're getting very good at recognizing them, some of them do appear to be these so-called 5 rockets, which have a fairly long range, rockets fired in the direction of tel aviv and jerusalem. also today, one of those rockets falling to the south near the settlement block in the west bank. and another building, an israeli building a town outside tel aviv on the road to jerusalem. so we've seen a fairly intense evening, certainly, of violence here, incoming, as well as outgoing. and all this talk about a ceasefire and discussions in cairo and elsewhere don't seem to be amounting to much at this time. now, today we did see something interesting. something we didn't see
brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we have reports from tel aviv, gaza, and cairo. and ray suarez examines the prospects ahead for the peace deal. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports from turkey where the syrian civil war is having an impact along the shared 500 mile border and in ankara. >> with fighting in syrian areas, spilling over into turkish towns, turkey finds itself walking a fine line between defending its interests, and being drawn into a regional war. >> brown: after the deluge: we assess the impact of all the money spent in the most expensive campaign in history. >> woodruff: as recovery costs from superstorm sandy continue to rise, paul solman looks at weather risks and the business of insurance. >> all insurance companies are paying very careful attention to the variability and the volatility in the climate. >> brown: and poet joy harjo celebrates the focal point of families and thanksgiving: the kitchen table. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 ye
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: police and protesters clashed in cairo's tahrir square and elsewhere in egypt today, sparked when president mohamed morsi granted himself broad new powers. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the widespread demonstrations, and assess what's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we
himself sweeping powers last week. correspondent steve harrigan has the latest from cairo. >> egypt president mohammed morsi is looking for a way out the fire storm he created thursday when he claimed the orders were not subject to review by egypt's court that move sparked four days of violent street in egypt. in the protest, 13 offices of the muslim brotherhood, morsi's chief supporters were ransacked or set on fire. morsi met today with senior judges from the judiciary council looking for a compromise to halt the violence. aides say morsi might be willing to limit the scope of his decree, but not withdraw it entirely. morsi supporters say the increased powers are only temporary, until a new constitution is completed. opponents say it's a power grab and part of an attempt to instill islamic law in egypt. >> we demand the president listen to people who chose it. people elected him so he would defend the people. not to do what he pleases. >> the administration was careful with the words. not overly critical. we raised concerns. that in part answers the questions. >> they reach out fo
. an israeli official reportedly just landed in cairo, where egypt is trying to broke are a cease-fire. as israel signals it is open to negotiation, it is also preparing for the possibility of a ground war. we have team coverage. we have a reporter on the ground and a reporter traveling with president obottom akeeping a close eye on the middle-east. leyland? >> reporter: shannon, this is a country on the brink of war, just over my right shoulder is the gas station, where many citizens soldier some of the 30,000 reservivist, called up, stopping for everything from oreos to water to do rito's to pick up before they man their tank, maneuvering in the black of this, right behind me, before possibly heading into gazzasm more than a dozen palestinian killed in airstrikes inside the gaza strip. many of them are civilian, some children. here, we have had at least a dozen injured. this is quite literally the tip of the israeli spear. these are citizen shoaleddiers, a lot of them engineers or accountants, drafted into service here. they are getting their tanks ready, all along the gaza bord
you overseas where the u.s. embassy in cairo is shutting its doors to the public today as police clash with demonstrators in a new round of violent protests in tahrir square. all this comes as we wait to hear from president morsi who's expected to appear on egyptian television, and it could be his appearance as soon as this hour. steve harrigan's in cairo with more. steve? >> reporter: jenna, the protesters are out behind me for the or seventh night in a row, and as you mentioned, part of the u.s. embassy -- the part that deals with the public and visitor -- was shut down today not because the embassy was targeted, but really because of fears of peripheral violence. this whole section of downtown cairo has seen large street protests for the last several days, police and protesters exchanging rocks and tear gas. two buildings on this street were set on fire overnight. those blazes are now out. we are expecting to see egypt's president in a taped television address later today. he'll likely be introducing a new constitution that's being voted on by the assembly now. that constitution can
east. will that happen? we're going back live to gaza. we're going to cairo, we're going to israel. all of that right here in "the situation room." nd? ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevrolet. ♪ with a remarkable new interior featuring the available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. this is where sophisticated styling begins. and where it ends? that's up to you. it's here -- the greatest malibu ever. ♪ is what drives us to broadcast the world's biggest events in 3d, or live to your seat high above the atlantic ocean. it's what drives us to create eco-friendly race tracks, batteries that power tomo's cars, and the sustainable smart towns of the future. at panasonic, we're driven to make what matters most better. just another way we're engineering a better world for you. yeah, i might have ears like a rabbit... but i want to eat meat! [ male announcer ] iams knows dogs love meat. ...but most dry foods add plant protein, like gluten iams never adds gluten. iams adds 50% more animal protein, [ dog 2 ] look at me! i'm a lean, mean flying machine [ dog 1 ] i am too! woo
in cairo and they agreed on a cease-fire, and the israeli government surprised us. and then -- i hope this will be an eye-opener for mr. netanyahu. i hope that he will get one lesson. the lesson is that security will only be achieved through peace, through the two-step solution. security will not be achieved through bombing and wars and war-mongering. we need to reach this conclusion and we need now to support everything offered by the egyptians in order to get a comprehensive cease-fire. that's what we're working on. he's fully engaged with all palestinian actions, including hamas, and is fully on board to achieve a blanket comprehensive cease-fire because that's what will help all concerned, palestinians, israelis, and americans. >> i know one of the issues the israelis are demanding in the israeli cabinet, i'm told is meeting right now, even as we speak, the so-called international security cabinet, the prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, one of the things they want to make sure is that even if there's a cease-fire, the shelling into israel, some of these rockets and missiles don't
streaming live from cairo with the latest. steve, do you think that we could see some kind of compromise today on this? >> reporter: martha, we are certainly hearing sound from the presidential teamsh to reace opposition in a push for a possible compromise. what we're likely to see in the next 90 minutes here is a meeting between egypt's president and some top judges here inside cairo. judges across the country have gone on strike. they say the president tried to put himself above the law. we could see some scaling back from a presidential team that has been surprised by the angry reaction to the move by president morsi, martha. martha: such a key moment for the future of egypt. what happens if they fail to reach any kind of compromise here? >> reporter: well for the past four days we've already seen violence in the streets not only here in cairo but other egyptian cities as well. more than 500 people wounded, one person killed. if there is no compromise today, we could see million man marches on both sides of the issue tomorrow in cairo. when you have a million people on one side, a mil
crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. however, i must put myself on a clear path that will lead to the achievement of a clear goal. >> brown: the president's backers insisted the decree would be in effect only until a new constitution is approved. >> ( translated ): yes, he might be a dictator for the time being or might have unprecedented power throughout this period of two months, but after that, these powers will be transferred to an elected parliament. >> brown: but tens of thousands of anti-morsi protesters rallied in tahrir square, the heart of last year's popular revolution that led to end of the regime of hosni mubarak. they threw rocks at riot police, who retaliated by firing tear gas canisters to disperse the crowds. >> this is just a new era of dictatorship in
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